The South Africa I know,

The Home I Understand

Results for: buy ivermectin for humans online πŸ‘†πŸ½ for COVID 19 ☝🏽 New Zealand πŸ‡πŸ΅ Pharmacy link: πŸ‡³πŸ‡Ώ AllForHeal.net πŸ‡³πŸ‡Ώ 🍡 πŸ‡ where to buy stromectol New Zealand 🌯 🌯

No content results found.

Perhaps you should try again with a different search term.

No publication results found.

Perhaps you should try again with a different search term.

Ndlambe

The Ndlambe Local Municipality is a predominantly rural area with agriculture and tourism dominating the economy. It encompasses the towns of Kenton-on-sea, Boknes, Bathurst, Boesmansriviermond, Alexandra and Cannon Rocks. (http://www.cacadu.co.za/ndlambe)

read more »


Kou-Kamma

Kou-Kamma Local Municipality is situated in the Cacadu District Municipality alongside the coast of the Indian Ocean in the south-western area of the Eastern Cape province. Kou-Kamma spans 35 575 km2 and neighbours the Baviaans Local Municipality in the north, and the Kouga Local Municipality to the east.

read more »


Ngqushwa

Ngqushwa Local Municipality, located in the Eastern Cape, is bounded on the east by the Great Fish River and on the south by the Indian Ocean. The municipality is an amalgamation of two towns namely, Hamburg and Peddie. It is one of the eight municipalities that fall under the Amathole District Municipality. Source: Ngqushwa municipality website.read more »


Lukhanji

Lukhanji is a category B municipality situated within the Chris Hani District of the Eastern Cape. It is made up of a combination of the greater Queenstown and surrounding farms and villages, Ilinge, Hewu/Whittlesea and Ntabethemba. Lukhanji is landlocked by the municipalities of Tsolwana and Inkwanca to the west, Emalahleni and Intsika Yethu to the north, and Amahlathi to the east. Lukhanji occupies a strategic geographic position within the Chris Hani District Municipality and covers approximately 4 231 km².

read more »


Emalahleni

Emalahleni Local Municipality is a category B municipality situated within the Chris Hani District Municipality of the Eastern Cape province. It has 17 wards which service the three main towns, namely Lady Frere, where the main offices are, Indwe and Dordrecht; and surrounding villages of Lady Frere, as the other two towns have urban locations and farms.read more »


Causes of Death 2013

The registration of deaths in South Africa is governed by the Births and Deaths Registration Act, 1992 (Act No. 51 of 1992), as amended. The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) uses death notification form DHA-1663 to register all deaths and stillbirths. Stats SA collects completed death notification forms from the DHA head office for data processing, analysis, report writing and dissemination. Causes of death statistics are compiled in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) regulations that require that member nations classify and code causes of death using the tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). Statistics from civil registration are the only national source of information on mortality and causes of death in South Africa. Such information is invaluable for the assessment and monitoring of the health status of the population and for planning of adequate health interventions. Accordingly, these statistics are also essential in tracking progress and monitoring key development objectives outlined in the National Development Plan (NDP) adopted by the South African government in 2012. The plan asserts that health care can be improved through decreasing mortality by combating infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS and the emerging tide of non-communicable diseases. The government objective, ‘Health care for all by 2030’ outlined in the NDP is aimed at reducing child and infant mortality; maternal mortality; and combating HIV/AIDS and other diseases by 2030.read more »


Gender Statistics

South Africa has a history of exclusion and discrimination on all kinds of grounds, such as race and gender. For this reason we have developed one of the most inclusive constitutions in the world, with a Bill of Rights that specifically refers to equal treatment for all regardless of race, age, disability status, socio-economic status and gender (Section 9). Legislation – such as the Employment Equity Act of 1998 – has facilitated access to formal employment for women, where employers are legally required to work towards more equitable representation based on gender, race and disability. Our National Development Plan 2030 envisions an inclusive society and economy, free from unequal opportunities through capacity building, redress and increased interaction. Through a combination of legislation, monitoring and accountability, significant progress has been made in this regard, especially in the public sector. For example, the percentage of women in senior management positions in the public service increased from 13% in 1998 to 42% in 2017. Gender and gender statistics are not just about women. Whereas the term sex refers to a biological male/female classification, the word gender connotes more than that. It encapsulates social and cultural differences, and also includes how an individual views him-/herself. The term “gender role” relates to society’s concept of how men and women are expected to act. Gender stereotypes form the basis of sexism, or the prejudiced beliefs that value males over females or vice versa. Gender inequality refers to the unequal treatment and/or perceptions of inequality of men in relation to women or vice versa. Even though there are instances where discrimination occurs against men, more often than not women are at a disadvantage. This is manifested in, for example, preferential access to work and/or certain jobs for men, unequal pay for equal work, bullying, domination and violence against women, selective abortion of female children, and preferential household expenditure on boys’ education. While great strides have been made towards equality for women, there still remains great challenges; there is a need for continued measurement and policy and programmatic interventions. In addition to monitoring progress with regard to the situation of men and women, an understanding of gender gaps in the following key areas will move the agenda of leaving no one behind forward: Market participation – Equal representation of both sexes in the labour force is important; gender equality allows for an increase in the number of women participating in the work force, which expands the labour force and can contribute towards increased economic productivity and growth. Resource equity – Indicators of men’s and women’s asset ownership and control are important measures used to monitor gender equality. This is achieved when people are able to access and enjoy the same rewards, resources and opportunities regardless of whether they are male or female. Women’s ownership of and control over resources is one of the key elements of empowerment. Governance – Gender equality in positions of decision-making, as well as political representation, are important not only from an empowerment perspective, but also to ensure that issues affecting women are considered during policy formulation, planning and programme/project implementation. Stats SA publishes a wide range of statistics in various reports and publications, highlighting the challenges experienced by women and men in South Africa as measured through household surveys and censuses conducted by Stats SA, as well as other sources.read more »