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Results for: Income from accommodation decreased by 66,8% year-on-year in November 2020, the result of a 52,7% decrease in the number of stay unit nights sold and a 29,7% decrease in the average income per stay unit sold. The largest decline in income was reported by hotels, down 69,6%.

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Mookgopong

Mookgophong is a charming and thriving town in the Waterberg encircled by peaceful nature reserves and steaming hot springs. The Bushveld climate and attractive resorts in the area attract holidaymakers all year round. Mookgophong (previously known as Naboomspruit) dates back to the late 1800's when it was a rest station for the Pretoria-Polokwane mail coach. Although the little village eventually developed around the railway station on the farm Naboomspruit, Mookgophong owes its growth largely to the discovery of minerals in the area in the early 1900's. The discovery of tin led to a "tin rush" in 1910 and turned this little village into a boom town of restaurants, cabarets and trading stores. The discovery of platinum in later years added to the towns expansion.The town is named after the euphorbia tree. The new name Mookgophong has the same meaning as the original Naboomspruit.read more »


Engcobo

Engcobo Local Municipality is located in the Chris Hani District of the Eastern Cape, the second largest province in terms of land coverage on the south-eastern seaboard of South Africa. Engcobo consists of 20 wards, extends over 2258,78km with a population of 155513, and constitutes 19,6% of the total population of the district, as per the Census 2011 information.

The majority of the population is female (56%). There are about 66 people per square kilometre. The population is predominantly black African, followed by an insignificant number of Asians/Indians, coloureds and whites.

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Mhlontlo

The municipality comprises the magisterial areas of Qumbu and Tsolo. It is bounded to the south by the King Sabata Dalinyebo Local Municipality; to the east by the Nyandeni Local Municipality; and to the north by the Mzimvubu Local Municipality. The surface area of the municipality is 2826km2,with a population of 188226 persons in 2011, which translates to a population density of 66,6 persons per square kilometre.

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Moretele

Moretele Local Municipality is located in an area called Moretele, which is situated far north of Pretoria in the North West province. The municipality was built in 2000, and covers an area of 1369km2. It is located strategically to join four provinces, namely North West, Gauteng, Mpumalanga and Limpopo. Moretele is the Setswana name for a river that runs through the area, namely Noka ya Moretele (the Moretele River).

The Municipality comprises of 24 wards, which are made up of 66 villages and plots. Most villages are ruled by 4 traditional leaders(Dikgosi) who are recognised by law and who all represent their respective tribes/communities in council.

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Senqu

Senqu Local Municipality is located in the Joe Gqabi District of the Eastern Cape Province, sharing its northern border with the country of Lesotho. Senqu is a Sesotho name for the Orange River. (http://en.wikipedia.org). 83,5% of the population lives in a non-urban environment, and major settlements include Barkley East, Mareteng and Voyizane.read more »


Poverty

Poverty is a key development challenge in social, economic and political terms; not only in South Africa but throughout the developing world. In post-apartheid South Africa, fighting the legacy of poverty and under-development has always been a central theme of Government. This was cemented in the Reconstruction and Development Plan (RDP) of 1994 and reiterated in the National Development Plan (NDP) published in 2011.

The guiding objectives of the NDP is the elimination of poverty and the reduction in inequality and all the elements of the plan must demonstrate their effect on these two objectives. The Living Conditions Survey (LCS) and the Income and Expenditure Survey (IES) conducted by Stats SA are the two primary contributors toward profiling and monitoring poverty and inequality over time.

These two surveys are fundamental components to the survey programme of any statistical agency. They are the leading tools for the measurement of absolute poverty and inequality and they are an extremely important building block for the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to stay current with the changing spending and consumption patterns of the country.

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Economic Growth

The diverse structure of the South African economy is a critical aspect of its historical and current growth performance. The manufacturing sector continues to occupy a significant share of the South Africa economy, despite its relative importance declining from 19 percent in 1993 to about 17 percent in 2012 in real terms.

In line with structural changes in many economies, it not surprising to observe that the finance, real estate and business services sector has increase its relative importance of 17 per cent in 1993 to approximately 24 per cent in 2012. These two sectors and a few more are an important part of the South African growth story since the dawn of democracy.

Despite that, less than a decade into the 21st century, many countries, including South Africa, experienced the global economic crisis.This has affected economic growth in South Africa over the last four years, prompting a deceleration in rate of economic growth.

South Africa experienced an average growth rate of approximately 5 per cent in real terms between 2004 and 2007. However, the period 2008 to 2012 only recorded average growth just above 2 per cent; largely a result of the global economic recession.

Of the nine provinces in South Africa, three power houses stand out. Gauteng, Kwazulu-Natal and Western Cape collectively contribute a significant portion to the countrys value added, reported at over 60 percent.

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Unemployment

Employment is a key economic indicator and it is sensitive to the business cycle. For example employment peaked in 2008 to approximately 13,8 million when the economy was better. However, during the recession of 2009 and 2010 approximately 806 000 persons lost their jobs. After these two successive years of decline, employment grew by 204 000 and 258 000 persons in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Community & social services industry contributed the most to the growth in employment observed in the past two years. This was followed by Finance and other business services.read more »


National Accounts

The diverse structure of the South African economy is a critical aspect of its historical and current growth performance. The manufacturing sector continues to occupy a significant share of the South Africa economy, despite its relative importance declining from 19 percent in 1993 to about 17 percent in 2012 in real terms. In line with structural changes in many economies, it not surprising to observe that the finance, real estate and business services sector has increase its relative importance of 17 per cent in 1993 to approximately 24 per cent in 2012. These two sectors and a few more are an important part of the South African growth story since the dawn of democracy.read more »


Inflation

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) and Producer Price Index (PPI) are the two primary measures of inflation for South Africa. Both indicators are published on a monthly basis.The Consumer Price Index tracks the rate of change in the prices of goods and services purchased by consumers. The headline CPI is used as the inflation target measure which guides the South African Reserve Bank on the setting of interest rates.

The Producer Price Index tracks the rate of change in the prices charged by producers of goods. Stats SA publishes PPIs for different industries with the PPI for final manufactured goods being the headline PPI. Additional PPIs are compiled for Agriculture, forestry and fishing; Mining and quarrying; Electricity and water; Intermediate manufactured goods; Imports and Exports; and Construction.

The PPI is widely used by businesses as a contract escalator and as a general indicator of inflationary pressures in the economy.

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