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Nkonkobe

Nkonkobe Local Municipality was established in 2000 and is dominated by the settlements of Amagqunukwebe, Amajingqi and Fort Beaufort. 60% of the population live in rural areas, and the majority of the urban population lives in the towns of Fort Beaufort and Alice.

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Lukhanji

Lukhanji is a category B municipality situated within the Chris Hani District of the Eastern Cape. It is made up of a combination of the greater Queenstown and surrounding farms and villages, Ilinge, Hewu/Whittlesea and Ntabethemba. Lukhanji is landlocked by the municipalities of Tsolwana and Inkwanca to the west, Emalahleni and Intsika Yethu to the north, and Amahlathi to the east. Lukhanji occupies a strategic geographic position within the Chris Hani District Municipality and covers approximately 4 231 km².

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Emnambithi/Ladysmith

Emnambithi-Ladysmith Local Municipality forms part of the Uthukela District Municipality, with Ladysmith, Ezakheni, Steadville and Colenso/Nkanyezi as main urban areas. Ladysmith is the primary urban area, located along the N11 national route, 20 kilometres off the N3 national route. The priority development issues for Emnambithi-Ladysmith Local Municipality are physical infrastructure and services; social development and services; economic development; land reform, etc. Urban areas have far more services than rural ones but a much smaller population, indicating a clear imbalance in service provision. The Driefontein Complex has been identified as an area for priority spending. It has the highest population concentration but the lowest service standards.

(Source: http://www.ladysmith.co.za)

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Umtshezi

uMtshezi Local Municipality is an administrative area in the Uthukela District of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. uMtshezi is an isiZulu word for Bushman or San. uMtshezi Local Municipality comprises parts of the Magisterial Districts of Weenen and Estcourt, the informal settlements of Cornfields, Thembalihle, Mimosadale, and numerous settlements around Weenen. Estcourt is the largest commercial centre in the Midlands region, and an important service centre for the nearby towns of Mooi River, Winterton, Bergville, Colenso and Weenen. Weenen is a small agricultural town that is starting to emerge as a tourist destination. The majority of the people in the municipality are concentrated in urban areas and in farming areas but there are a few patches of high-density settlements within the informal areas. (Source: www.kzncogta.gov.za)read more »


Okhahlamba

The Okhahlamba Local Municipality is situated in the mountainous region of KwaZulu-Natal between Lesotho, the Free State, Emnambithi and Mtshezi. This municipality derived its name from a range of mountains which stretches more than 400km. It consists of privately owned commercial farmlands, smallholder settlements, the urban areas of Bergville, Winterton, Cathkin Park and Geluksberg, and two tribal authority areas.read more »


Household Service Delivery Statistics

The dawn of democracy in 1994 created a new dispensation in which access to basic services such as housing, water and sanitation was recognized as a fundamental human right. South Africa inherited high levels of poverty and it continues to be confronted with unequal and often inadequate access to resources, infrastructure and social services. The Bill of Rights enshrined the right to basic services and commanded that the state must take reasonable measures to achieve the progressive realisation of these rights. Faced by inadequate information about the state of development in South Africa, Statistics South Africa (then called the Central Statistical Service) launched the October Household Survey (OHS) programme in 1993. The survey was discontinued in 1999 and subsequently replaced by the General Household Survey (GHS) which was instituted in 2002 in order to determine the level of development in the country and the performance of programs and projects on a regular basis. The GHS continues to evolve and key questions are continuously added and/or modified in consultation with key stakeholders to maintain the relevance and quality of data. In addition to measuring access to key services, the level of satisfaction with, as well as perceived quality of selected services provided by Government are also measured.read more »


sustainable development goals

The global agenda on sustainable development is best expressed through the SDGs, what one can best describe as the ultimate measure of progress which is about prosperity for people and planet. The SDGs, a set of 17 “Global Goals”, 169 targets, and 230 indicators, are a standard for evaluating if progress is being made across the world to reduce poverty, improve quality of life, and realise aspirations of the masses of people towards development. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): Indicator Baseline Report 2017 This report sheds light on what has been done and on what more needs to be accomplished in order to rid South Africa of extreme poverty. Structure of the report The report covers all 17 goals stated in the SDG documents. Each goal will be treated as a separate chapter in the report. Each chapter will be structured as follows: 1)         An introduction linking the sustainable development goal to the country’s National Development Plan (NDP), related policies, programmes and projects initiated by departments and institutions. 2)         Statement of the individual targets relating to the goal together with all indicators pertaining to specific targets. 3)         The definition of the indicator as well as the method of computing the indicator values. 4)         A baseline indicator value and where applicable, a chart/table indicating changes over time for the selected indicators are given. Baseline indicator values are based on data obtained during the base year (2016) or the year closest to 2016 for which data was available. In instances where the base year/period is not referenced on the charts/tables, the base year is 2016. 5)         Indication of the data source(s). 6)         Where possible, a comment section relating to the indicator is included. Click here for GoalTracker Portalread more »


Crime statistics

  Crime prevention and ultimate elimination is one of the priority goals of the National Development Plan (NDP). Crime affects all people irrespective of their background, and it is a topic that attracts a lot of media attention. Analysis will show that some groupings are affected by certain types of crime more than others. Crime statistics are essential in order to understand the temporal and spatial dynamics of crime. Such understanding is vital for planning targeted interventions and assessing progress made towards achieving a crime free nation where "people living in South Africa feel safe at home, at school and at work, and they enjoy a community life free of fear. Women walk freely in the streets and children play safely outside". There are two major sources of crime statistics in South Africa, namely the South African Police Service (SAPS) and Statistics South Africa (Stats SA). The other smaller sources such as the Institute for Security Studies (ISS) and the Medical Research Council (MRC) are by no means insignificant, as they provide statistics for types of crime not adequately covered by the major players, such as domestic violence. While the methodologies used by the SAPS and Stats SA are very different, the two institutions produce crime statistics that complement each other. The SAPS produces administrative data of crime reported to police stations by victims, the public and crime reported as a result of police activity. Stats SA produces crime statistics estimated from household surveys. Crimes reported to the SAPS do not always have the same definitions as crime statistics produced from VOCS. In addition, not all crimes reported by the SAPS are reported by VOCS and vice versa. Working in close collaboration with Stats SA, the South African Police Service has undertaken to align its Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (CCSP) to the International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (ICCS). Highlights of the 2017/18 Victims of Crime report Aggregate crime levels increased in 2017/18 compared to 2016/17. It is estimated that over 1,5 million incidences of household crime occurred in South Africa in 2017/18, which constitutes an increase of 5% compared to the previous year. Incidences of crime on individuals are estimated to be over 1,6 million, which is an increase of 5% from the previous year. Aggregate household crime levels increased in Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, North West, Gauteng and Mpumalanga. Individual crime levels increased in Free State, North West and Gauteng. North West experienced a drastic increase of 80% in the individual crime level. Perceptions of South Africans on crime in 2017/18 were more skeptical compared to the previous year. About 42% thought property crime increased during the past three years. This is an increase of 6,9% from the previous year. 46% thought violent crime increased during the past three years, an increase of 4,5% over the previous year. Western Cape was the most skeptical about crime trends, as 84% of Western Cape residents thought that crime in South African increased or stayed the same. Mpumalanga was the least skeptical among the nine provinces, where 65% thought that crime increased or stayed the same during the past three years. Crimes that are feared most are those that are most common. An estimated 79% of South Africans felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhoods during the day, which is a decrease of 6,7% from last year. About 32% of South Africans felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhoods at night, constituting an increase of 8% from last year. The highlights for household and individual experiences of crime from the 2016/17 VOCS report are as follows:  read more »