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Polokwane

Polokwane Municipality is situated in the central part of the Limpopo Province. The municipality shares the name with the biggest town in Limpopo called Polokwane. Locally it shares borders with three other local municipalities within Capricorn District as well as local municipalities in Mopani and Waterberg Districts. It is the largest metropolitan complex in the north and a major economic centre with 38 wards. Its proximity to the neighboring countries of Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Swaziland makes it a perfect gateway to Africa and an attractive tourist destination. The settlement types indicates that it is more urban than rural.read more »


Mthonjaneni

In 1887, when the British government annexed Zululand, they established several magisterial districts. One district was Mthonjaneni, and the centre of the district was what is known today as Melmoth, named after Sir Melmoth Osborn, the first British Chief Native Commissioner for Zululand. Melmoth was essentially a 'gold rush town'.

At the turn of the century, gold was mined at the Melmoth Gold Fields, five kilometers out of town, but this was a short-term venture. Deserted diggings can still be found in some areas.

(Source:www.melmoth.co.za).

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Musina

Musina in the Limpopo Valley is the northernmost town in South Africa. Situated close to the Beit Bridge border post between South Africa and Zimbabwe, it is the main entry point into the country from countries north of South Africa. The town developed around the copper mining industry in the area. Copper was first discovered in pre-historic times by the Musina people who named it musina, meaning spoiler, because they considered it a poor substitute for iron, which is what they were after. The mineral was later re-discovered and mined by 20th century miners. Today iron, coal, magnetite, graphite, asbestos, diamonds and copper are mined here. With fascinating attractions and many game farms in the area, tourism and hunting play an important role in the economy of the town. The recently declared world heritage site of Mapungubwe (meaning Hill of the Jackal) is one of the richest archaeological sites in the country. Botanical highlights of the region include fine specimens of baobab trees and impala lilies which are both protected species. Agricultural products include citrus, mangoes, tomatoes and dates.read more »


//Khara Hais

//Khara Hais Local Municipality is a Category B municipality and is located in the Siyanda District Municipality, which is the second-largest district in the Northern Cape. It is the acknowledged commercial, educational, military, agricultural, medical, transport and tourist center of the area. The unusual spelling of the name of the local municipality, with the // glyph, is a result of the transcription of the click consonant used in the Kxoe language from which the name originates.

The municipality straddles the Orange River. The main towns in this area are Upington, Raaswater, Louisvale, Kalksloot, Leerkrans, Karos and Lambrechtsdrift. Upington is the central town situated 400km west of Kimberley. Upington has an airport and a landing strip. This town plays a very prominent role in the lives of the residents of this local municipality. Upington was established in the 1870s when the Reverend Christiaan Schroder was sent from Cape Town to establish a mission at the request of the Hottentots chieftain Klaas Lucas, who realized the importance of being able to read and write. Shortly after the establishment of the Mission, various pioneer settlers including Japie Lutz and the Reverend Schroder realized that the area was ideal for irrigation development and the first irrigation canals were hand-dug in 1880 - some of which are still in use today. Since then, Upington grew rapidly today, Upington is the Provincial Capital for the Northern Cape Province and as such has taken on a new and important role in the development of the whole region.

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!Kheis

!Kheis is a Khoi name meaning "a place where you live, or a home". The municipality is named in recognition of the Khoi people who were the first permanent dwellers of the area. The!Kheis Municipal Area was initially inhabited by the Khoi-San people, who are also the first permanent inhabitants of South Africa. The San, who lived a nomadic life, migrated through the area. The Korannas (Khoi group) arrived in the area during the 18th century. They were widely spread over the Benede Oranje area and consisted of various tribes, each with its own captain (leader). The groups who lived in the! Kheisarea, was under the leadership of Captain Willem Bostander and Klaas Springbok. Many of their descendants still live in the area today. Other Khoi-groups, such as the Griekwas, also migrated through the area and intermarried with the Korannas. Later coloured stock farmers, as well as white hunters and farmers arrived.read more »


Agricultural Statistics

The history of agricultural statistics in South Africa goes back as far back as the beginning of the 20th century. With the exception of the World Wars and great depression years, an agricultural census was conducted on annual basis in the first half of the 20th century. As agricultures contribution to the countrys gross domestic product (GDP) decreased over the years, so did the frequency of conducting agricultural censuses. Post 1994, agricultural censuses have been conducted on a five yearly basis, with annual surveys being conducted in between the census years. Until now, agricultural censuses and surveys have largely concentrated on commercial agriculture leaving out small-scale and subsistence agriculture. In 2009, Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) conducted an audit of agricultural statistics in the country. One of the findings was that the country lacked information on smallholder and subsistence agriculture. The current list of farmers being used to conduct surveys was mainly confined to commercial agriculture. A decision was taken that three questions related to agriculture would be included in the Population Census 2011 (Census 2011) questionnaire. The main objective was to identify all households involved in agriculture in the country, so that a complete frame of all individuals and entities involved in agriculture (both subsistence and commercial) could be generated. This will allow for a comprehensive agricultural census to be conducted.read more »


Poverty

Poverty is a key development challenge in social, economic and political terms; not only in South Africa but throughout the developing world. In post-apartheid South Africa, fighting the legacy of poverty and under-development has always been a central theme of Government. This was cemented in the Reconstruction and Development Plan (RDP) of 1994 and reiterated in the National Development Plan (NDP) published in 2011.

The guiding objectives of the NDP is the elimination of poverty and the reduction in inequality and all the elements of the plan must demonstrate their effect on these two objectives. The Living Conditions Survey (LCS) and the Income and Expenditure Survey (IES) conducted by Stats SA are the two primary contributors toward profiling and monitoring poverty and inequality over time.

These two surveys are fundamental components to the survey programme of any statistical agency. They are the leading tools for the measurement of absolute poverty and inequality and they are an extremely important building block for the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to stay current with the changing spending and consumption patterns of the country.

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sustainable development goals

The global agenda on sustainable development is best expressed through the SDGs, what one can best describe as the ultimate measure of progress which is about prosperity for people and planet. The SDGs, a set of 17 Global Goals, 169 targets, and 230 indicators, are a standard for evaluating if progress is being made across the world to reduce poverty, improve quality of life, and realise aspirations of the masses of people towards development. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): Indicator Baseline Report 2017 This report sheds light on what has been done and on what more needs to be accomplished in order to rid South Africa of extreme poverty. Structure of the report The report covers all 17 goals stated in the SDG documents. Each goal will be treated as a separate chapter in the report. Each chapter will be structured as follows: 1) An introduction linking the sustainable development goal to the countrys National Development Plan (NDP), related policies, programmes and projects initiated by departments and institutions. 2) Statement of the individual targets relating to the goal together with all indicators pertaining to specific targets. 3) The definition of the indicator as well as the method of computing the indicator values. 4) A baseline indicator value and where applicable, a chart/table indicating changes over time for the selected indicators are given. Baseline indicator values are based on data obtained during the base year (2016) or the year closest to 2016 for which data was available. In instances where the base year/period is not referenced on the charts/tables, the base year is 2016. 5) Indication of the data source(s). 6) Where possible, a comment section relating to the indicator is included. Click here forGoalTracker Portalread more »


Causes of Death 2013

The registration of deaths in South Africa is governed by the Births and Deaths Registration Act, 1992 (Act No. 51 of 1992), as amended. The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) uses death notification form DHA-1663 to register all deaths and stillbirths. Stats SA collects completed death notification forms from the DHA head office for data processing, analysis, report writing and dissemination. Causes of death statistics are compiled in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) regulations that require that member nations classify and code causes of death using the tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). Statistics from civil registration are the only national source of information on mortality and causes of death in South Africa. Such information is invaluable for the assessment and monitoring of the health status of the population and for planning of adequate health interventions. Accordingly, these statistics are also essential in tracking progress and monitoring key development objectives outlined in the National Development Plan (NDP) adopted by the South African government in 2012. The plan asserts that health care can be improved through decreasing mortality by combating infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS and the emerging tide of non-communicable diseases. The government objective, Health care for all by 2030 outlined in the NDP is aimed at reducing child and infant mortality; maternal mortality; and combating HIV/AIDS and other diseases by 2030.read more »


Gender Statistics

South Africa has a history of exclusion and discrimination on all kinds of grounds, such as race and gender. For this reason we have developed one of the most inclusive constitutions in the world, with a Bill of Rights that specifically refers to equal treatment for all regardless of race, age, disability status, socio-economic status and gender (Section 9). Legislation such as the Employment Equity Act of 1998 has facilitated access to formal employment for women, where employers are legally required to work towards more equitable representation based on gender, race and disability. Our National Development Plan 2030 envisions an inclusive society and economy, free from unequal opportunities through capacity building, redress and increased interaction. Through a combination of legislation, monitoring and accountability, significant progress has been made in this regard, especially in the public sector. For example, the percentage of women in senior management positions in the public service increased from 13% in 1998 to 42% in 2017. Gender and gender statistics are not just about women. Whereas the term sex refers to a biological male/female classification, the word gender connotes more than that. It encapsulates social and cultural differences, and also includes how an individual views him-/herself. The term gender role relates to societys concept of how men and women are expected to act. Gender stereotypes form the basis of sexism, or the prejudiced beliefs that value males over females or vice versa. Gender inequality refers to the unequal treatment and/or perceptions of inequality of men in relation to women or vice versa. Even though there are instances where discrimination occurs against men, more often than not women are at a disadvantage. This is manifested in, for example, preferential access to work and/or certain jobs for men, unequal pay for equal work, bullying, domination and violence against women, selective abortion of female children, and preferential household expenditure on boys education. While great strides have been made towards equality for women, there still remains great challenges; there is a need for continued measurement and policy and programmatic interventions. In addition to monitoring progress with regard to the situation of men and women, an understanding of gender gaps in the following key areas will move the agenda of leaving no one behind forward: Market participation Equal representation of both sexes in the labour force is important; gender equality allows for an increase in the number of women participating in the work force, which expands the labour force and can contribute towards increased economic productivity and growth. Resource equity Indicators of mens and womens asset ownership and control are important measures used to monitor gender equality. This is achieved when people are able to access and enjoy the same rewards, resources and opportunities regardless of whether they are male or female. Womens ownership of and control over resources is one of the key elements of empowerment. Governance Gender equality in positions of decision-making, as well as political representation, are important not only from an empowerment perspective, but also to ensure that issues affecting women are considered during policy formulation, planning and programme/project implementation. Stats SA publishes a wide range of statistics in various reports and publications, highlighting the challenges experienced by women and men in South Africa as measured through household surveys and censuses conducted by StatsSA, as well as other sources.read more »