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Jozini

Jozini Local Municipality is under Umkhanyakude District Municipality, located in the north eastern part of Kwazulu Natal. The municipality shares a border with Swaziland to the west and Mozambique to the north. It covers 3057 km of the total area of Umkhanyakude District Municipality. Jozini was predominatly a rural municipality with 89% of the population residing in rural areas under the jurisdiction of tradional authorities. Main towns *** Census 2011 reveals that Jozini is the most populated municipalty within Umkhanyakude making up (186 502) 29.8% of the Umkhanyakude District. Jozini has a large dam constructed on the Phongola River on the eastern end of a narrow gorge separating the Lebombo and Ubombo mountains. The main towns include Ingwavuma, Jozini, uBombo, Bhambanana, Mkuze and Ndumo.read more »


Ingwe

Ingwe Local Municipality is situated in the southern part of KwaZulu-Natal, and falls under the Sisonke District Municipality, which borders the Eastern Cape and Lesotho. It is the second largest municipality within the district. The municipal head office is located in Creighton, 112 km south-west of Howick and 176 km north-east of Kokstad. The town of Creighton fulfills the role of being the administrative centre for Ingwe and acts as the commercial centre for its surroundings within the municipal area. The rest of the municipal area consists of tribal lands, which dominate the area.read more »


KwaSani

KwaSani is an isiZulu name. "Kwa" means "at" and "Sani" means "San people". The name was chosen because it was easy to pronounce for overseas visitors to the World Heritage Site of Ukhahlamba. KwaSani Local Municipality is strategically placed at the foothills of the Southern Drakensberg, bordering the World Heritage Site. The municipality is bordered by Umkhomazi Wilderness Area to the west, Greater Kokstad to the south-west, Eastern Cape to the south, Ingwe Local Municipality to the east, and Impendle Local Municipality to the north. The area is 1180 km2 in extent with a population of 12 898.

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Greater Kokstad

The Greater Kokstad Municipality is one of the municipalities of the Sisonke District Municipality. It lies on the south-west tip of KwaZulu-Natal and is bordered by Matatiele Local Municipality on the west, Lesotho and part of the Eastern Cape on the north-west.The Greater Kokstad Municipality covers a land area of approximately 2682 km and shares its borders with KwaSani, Matatiele, Umziwabantu local municipalities, and the KwaZulu-Natal enclosed portion of the Eastern Cape. It is one of the five municipalities that make up the Sisonke District Municipality. Greater Kokstad Municipality functions as the district node and dominant commercial centre in the Sisonke district.read more »


Ubuhlebezwe

Ubuhlebezwe is one of five local municipalities that constitute the Sisonke District. It is located along the eastern boundary of the Sisonke District Municipality. It borders onto the Ingwe, Richmond, Vulamehlo, Umzumbe and UMzimkhulu local municipalities. It covers an area of approximately1604 km.

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Unemployment

Employment is a key economic indicator and it is sensitive to the business cycle. For example employment peaked in 2008 to approximately 13,8 million when the economy was better. However, during the recession of 2009 and 2010 approximately 806 000 persons lost their jobs. After these two successive years of decline, employment grew by 204 000 and 258 000 persons in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Community & social services industry contributed the most to the growth in employment observed in the past two years. This was followed by Finance and other business services.read more »


Causes of Death 2013

The registration of deaths in South Africa is governed by the Births and Deaths Registration Act, 1992 (Act No. 51 of 1992), as amended. The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) uses death notification form DHA-1663 to register all deaths and stillbirths. Stats SA collects completed death notification forms from the DHA head office for data processing, analysis, report writing and dissemination. Causes of death statistics are compiled in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) regulations that require that member nations classify and code causes of death using the tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). Statistics from civil registration are the only national source of information on mortality and causes of death in South Africa. Such information is invaluable for the assessment and monitoring of the health status of the population and for planning of adequate health interventions. Accordingly, these statistics are also essential in tracking progress and monitoring key development objectives outlined in the National Development Plan (NDP) adopted by the South African government in 2012. The plan asserts that health care can be improved through decreasing mortality by combating infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS and the emerging tide of non-communicable diseases. The government objective, Health care for all by 2030 outlined in the NDP is aimed at reducing child and infant mortality; maternal mortality; and combating HIV/AIDS and other diseases by 2030.read more »


Gender Statistics

South Africa has a history of exclusion and discrimination on all kinds of grounds, such as race and gender. For this reason we have developed one of the most inclusive constitutions in the world, with a Bill of Rights that specifically refers to equal treatment for all regardless of race, age, disability status, socio-economic status and gender (Section 9). Legislation such as the Employment Equity Act of 1998 has facilitated access to formal employment for women, where employers are legally required to work towards more equitable representation based on gender, race and disability. Our National Development Plan 2030 envisions an inclusive society and economy, free from unequal opportunities through capacity building, redress and increased interaction. Through a combination of legislation, monitoring and accountability, significant progress has been made in this regard, especially in the public sector. For example, the percentage of women in senior management positions in the public service increased from 13% in 1998 to 42% in 2017. Gender and gender statistics are not just about women. Whereas the term sex refers to a biological male/female classification, the word gender connotes more than that. It encapsulates social and cultural differences, and also includes how an individual views him-/herself. The term gender role relates to societys concept of how men and women are expected to act. Gender stereotypes form the basis of sexism, or the prejudiced beliefs that value males over females or vice versa. Gender inequality refers to the unequal treatment and/or perceptions of inequality of men in relation to women or vice versa. Even though there are instances where discrimination occurs against men, more often than not women are at a disadvantage. This is manifested in, for example, preferential access to work and/or certain jobs for men, unequal pay for equal work, bullying, domination and violence against women, selective abortion of female children, and preferential household expenditure on boys education. While great strides have been made towards equality for women, there still remains great challenges; there is a need for continued measurement and policy and programmatic interventions. In addition to monitoring progress with regard to the situation of men and women, an understanding of gender gaps in the following key areas will move the agenda of leaving no one behind forward: Market participation Equal representation of both sexes in the labour force is important; gender equality allows for an increase in the number of women participating in the work force, which expands the labour force and can contribute towards increased economic productivity and growth. Resource equity Indicators of mens and womens asset ownership and control are important measures used to monitor gender equality. This is achieved when people are able to access and enjoy the same rewards, resources and opportunities regardless of whether they are male or female. Womens ownership of and control over resources is one of the key elements of empowerment. Governance Gender equality in positions of decision-making, as well as political representation, are important not only from an empowerment perspective, but also to ensure that issues affecting women are considered during policy formulation, planning and programme/project implementation. Stats SA publishes a wide range of statistics in various reports and publications, highlighting the challenges experienced by women and men in South Africa as measured through household surveys and censuses conducted by StatsSA, as well as other sources.read more »


Economic Growth

The diverse structure of the South African economy is a critical aspect of its historical and current growth performance. The manufacturing sector continues to occupy a significant share of the South Africa economy, despite its relative importance declining from 19 percent in 1993 to about 17 percent in 2012 in real terms.

In line with structural changes in many economies, it not surprising to observe that the finance, real estate and business services sector has increase its relative importance of 17 per cent in 1993 to approximately 24 per cent in 2012. These two sectors and a few more are an important part of the South African growth story since the dawn of democracy.

Despite that, less than a decade into the 21st century, many countries, including South Africa, experienced the global economic crisis.This has affected economic growth in South Africa over the last four years, prompting a deceleration in rate of economic growth.

South Africa experienced an average growth rate of approximately 5 per cent in real terms between 2004 and 2007. However, the period 2008 to 2012 only recorded average growth just above 2 per cent; largely a result of the global economic recession.

Of the nine provinces in South Africa, three power houses stand out. Gauteng, Kwazulu-Natal and Western Cape collectively contribute a significant portion to the countrys value added, reported at over 60 percent.

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