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Results for: National Household Travel Survey of 2013

Measuring household expenditure on public transport

01 December 2015 Media Release Taxis most used mode of public transport Taxis are the commonly used mode of public transport in South Africa with just more than half (51,0%) of the households that use public transport (76,7%) relying on them, followed by busses (18,1%) and trains (7,6%). This was highlighted in the Measuring household   read more »


Travel time most important when choosing transport

Travel time most important when choosing transport

Travel time is the factor that influenced most households’ choice of transport. This is just one of the findings of the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS), conducted by Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) in 2013 for the National Department of Transport. At a national level, 32,6% of households indicated that travel time was the primary   read more »


The National Household Travel Survey in South Africa (NHTS)

Media Release 12 March 2014 The National Household Travel Survey in South Africa (NHTS) The National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) reveals that barriers to mobility in the country have been reduced in the last ten years, yet several challenges remain. Rural households had better access to public transport and had reduced travel times.  There has   read more »


Stats SA releases the Non -Motorised transport report

Media Invite                                                                                                                                                                     19 February 2016   Stats SA releases the Non -Motorised transport report The Statistician-General of South Africa, Dr Pali Lehohla, will release a report on the Non- Motorised transport (NMT) report at a media briefing to be held on Thursday, 25 February 2016. This report is an in-depth analysis of the National Household   read more »


Mbalo Brief – February 2016

Some parts of South Africa have experienced severe drought due to shortage of rainfall. According to the South African Weather Services (SAWS), the lowest annual total rainfall over the full 112-year period has been the January to December 2015 period. This period recorded an annual total of only 403 millimeters of rainfall. Government declared Mpumalanga,   read more »


Media Release: Education Series I – Focus on schooling in Limpopo

Media Release 12 March 2015   Education Series I: Focus on schooling in Limpopo report  gives details on the status of schooling in Limpopo About 97,9% of Limpopo residents between the ages of 7 and 18 years were attending some form of educational institution in 2013, up from 95,1% in 2002. This is according to   read more »


Mbalo Brief – February 2015

Since 2000, the United Nations (UN) member states observe International Mother Language Day on 21 February. This day was proclaimed by the General Conference of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) in November 1999. The purpose of the celebration is to promote linguistic and cultural diversity and multilingualism. The UN encourages member   read more »


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Click here to download a printable version. 1. What is a population census? A population census is a snapshot of a country at a particular moment in time. South Africa’s census will be held in October this year. Census night is the 9th of October 2011. The picture we are taking will tell us how many people   read more »


South Africans willingly put on their walking shoes

South Africans willingly put on their walking shoes

It would appear that South Africans are quite happy to wear out their shoe leather by walking to nearby destinations. Across all provinces, the majority of respondents indicated that they used their own energy to get to where they were going if their destination was nearby. Northern Cape had the lowest percentage of travellers who   read more »


Advertised bids

Advertised bids

DESCRIPTION REQUIRED AT BID NO. DUE AT 11:00 APPOINTMENT OF SERVICE PROVIDER TO PRINT MBALO BRIEF PUBLICATION FOR STATISTICS SOUTH AFRICA (STATS SA) FOR A PERIOD OF TWENTY FOUR (24) MONTHS  Compulsory briefing session:  Date: 04 July 2019 Time: 11:00 Venue: Isibalo House, Koch Street, Salvokop, Pretoria, 0002 NB: Please note that bid documents can   read more »


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Westonaria

Westonaria Local Municipality is situated approximately 60km from the economic hub of Gauteng, namely Johannesburg. The N12 and R28 national and provincial roads, as well as the railway line, provide easy access to the area. (www.westonaria.gov.za)read more »


Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality occupies 1975km2of the land area in the province of Gauteng (Wikipedia). The nameEkurhuleni means place of peace in Tsonga (Wikipedia), and the municipality is one of three metropolitan municipalities within Gauteng. Ekurhuleni is also home to South Africas largest airport, OR Tambo International Airport, which is located in the Kempton Park area.

Ekurhuleni is highly urbanised, with 99,4% of the population living in urban settlements ranging from informal settlements to elite urban residential suburbs. A number of large urbanised townships, such as Katlehong and Tokoza, also occupy the landscape.

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City of Tshwane

The City of Tshwane is the capital of South Africa and is the largest municipality, as measured by land mass. Tshwane is amongst the six largestmetropolitan municipalities in South Africa and the second largest in Gauteng, as measured by Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The Tshwane regioncovers 6 368km of Gautengs 19 055km and houses approximately 2,9million residents.Tshwane consists of seven regions with 105 wards and 210 councillors.

The City has a vibrant and diverse economy, which enables it to contribute at least 26,8% of the Gauteng Provinces GDP and 9,4% of the GDP of the national economy. Tshwane is the administrative capital of South Africa and is home to the Union Buildings with government-related business playing an important role in the local economy. As a result, the city is taking active measures to firmly position itself as Africa's leading capital city of excellence. The municipality's main economic sectors are community services and government, followed by finance and manufacturing. Metal products, machinery and household products are the largest sub-sectors within manufacturing. The City has a well-established manufacturing sector, with the automotive industry representing the most significant component.

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Ezingoleni

Ezinqoleni Local Municipality (KZ 215) is one of the six local municipalities that form part of the Ugu District (DC 21). This municipality is located on the south-western boundary of the Ugu District, adjacent to the west of the Hibiscus Coast Municipality and east of the uMuziwabantu Municipality.

The Ezinqoleni Local Municipal offices are situated within the Ezinqoleni settlement that is located some 40 kilometres west from Port Shepstone along the N2 national highway. The Ezinqoleni municipal area is 649 km2 (64 900 hectares) in extent with the major land uses in the area being tribal settlements, smallholdings and commercial farming. The Ezinqoleni Local Municipality is the smallest municipality in the district, and accounts for approximately 14% of the Ugu District area.

Approximately 35% of the municipality's total area can be classified as residential or smallholding areas, while the remaining 65% of the land is dedicated to agriculture/conservation and other non-residential land uses.

The Ezinqoleni Local Municipality constitutes a Category B municipality as determined by the Demarcations Board, falling within the ambit of a collective executive system municipality as described in the KwaZulu-Natal Determination of Types of Municipality Act, 2000.

The Ezinqoleni Local Municipality consists of 5 wards with 9 councillors (i.e. 5 Ward Councillors and 4 proportional representative Councillors).

(Source: www.ezinqoleni.gov.za)

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uMngeni

uMngeni Municipality pursues the creation of an enabling environment for investment opportunities, and the marketing of the municipality to domestic and international investors. A significant percentage of the high-potential agricultural land in the Midlands Meander falls within uMngeni Municipality. This provides an opportunity for agricultural sector growth. The forestry industry will be transformed through the establishment of community private partnerships. Small scale forestry opportunities will be created. The municipality seeks to build on the already successful tourism industry by promoting job creation in tourism, a safe and secure environment, and marketing the area as tourism destination (uMgungundlovu District Municipality IDP 2012/13).read more »


Crime statistics

  Crime prevention and ultimate elimination is one of the priority goals of the National Development Plan (NDP). Crime affects all people irrespective of their background, and it is a topic that attracts a lot of media attention. Analysis will show that some groupings are affected by certain types of crime more than others. Crime statistics are essential in order to understand the temporal and spatial dynamics of crime. Such understanding is vital for planning targeted interventions and assessing progress made towards achieving a crime free nation where "people living in South Africa feel safe at home, at school and at work, and they enjoy a community life free of fear. Women walk freely in the streets and children play safely outside". There are two major sources of crime statistics in South Africa, namely the South African Police Service (SAPS) and Statistics South Africa (Stats SA). The other smaller sources such as the Institute for Security Studies (ISS) and the Medical Research Council (MRC) are by no means insignificant, as they provide statistics for types of crime not adequately covered by the major players, such as domestic violence. While the methodologies used by the SAPS and Stats SA are very different, the two institutions produce crime statistics that complement each other. The SAPS produces administrative data of crime reported to police stations by victims, the public and crime reported as a result of police activity. Stats SA produces crime statistics estimated from household surveys. Crimes reported to the SAPS do not always have the same definitions as crime statistics produced from VOCS. In addition, not all crimes reported by the SAPS are reported by VOCS and vice versa. Working in close collaboration with Stats SA, the South African Police Service has undertaken to align its Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (CCSP) to the International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (ICCS). Highlights of the 2017/18 Victims of Crime report Aggregate crime levels increased in 2017/18 compared to 2016/17. It is estimated that over 1,5 million incidences of household crime occurred in South Africa in 2017/18, which constitutes an increase of 5% compared to the previous year. Incidences of crime on individuals are estimated to be over 1,6 million, which is an increase of 5% from the previous year. Aggregate household crime levels increased in Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, North West, Gauteng and Mpumalanga. Individual crime levels increased in Free State, North West and Gauteng. North West experienced a drastic increase of 80% in the individual crime level. Perceptions of South Africans on crime in 2017/18 were more skeptical compared to the previous year. About 42% thought property crime increased during the past three years. This is an increase of 6,9% from the previous year. 46% thought violent crime increased during the past three years, an increase of 4,5% over the previous year. Western Cape was the most skeptical about crime trends, as 84% of Western Cape residents thought that crime in South African increased or stayed the same. Mpumalanga was the least skeptical among the nine provinces, where 65% thought that crime increased or stayed the same during the past three years. Crimes that are feared most are those that are most common. An estimated 79% of South Africans felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhoods during the day, which is a decrease of 6,7% from last year. About 32% of South Africans felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhoods at night, constituting an increase of 8% from last year. The highlights for household and individual experiences of crime from the 2016/17 VOCS report are as follows:  read more »


Gender Statistics

South Africa has a history of exclusion and discrimination on all kinds of grounds, such as race and gender. For this reason we have developed one of the most inclusive constitutions in the world, with a Bill of Rights that specifically refers to equal treatment for all regardless of race, age, disability status, socio-economic status and gender (Section 9). Legislation such as the Employment Equity Act of 1998 has facilitated access to formal employment for women, where employers are legally required to work towards more equitable representation based on gender, race and disability. Our National Development Plan 2030 envisions an inclusive society and economy, free from unequal opportunities through capacity building, redress and increased interaction. Through a combination of legislation, monitoring and accountability, significant progress has been made in this regard, especially in the public sector. For example, the percentage of women in senior management positions in the public service increased from 13% in 1998 to 42% in 2017. Gender and gender statistics are not just about women. Whereas the term sex refers to a biological male/female classification, the word gender connotes more than that. It encapsulates social and cultural differences, and also includes how an individual views him-/herself. The term gender role relates to societys concept of how men and women are expected to act. Gender stereotypes form the basis of sexism, or the prejudiced beliefs that value males over females or vice versa. Gender inequality refers to the unequal treatment and/or perceptions of inequality of men in relation to women or vice versa. Even though there are instances where discrimination occurs against men, more often than not women are at a disadvantage. This is manifested in, for example, preferential access to work and/or certain jobs for men, unequal pay for equal work, bullying, domination and violence against women, selective abortion of female children, and preferential household expenditure on boys education. While great strides have been made towards equality for women, there still remains great challenges; there is a need for continued measurement and policy and programmatic interventions. In addition to monitoring progress with regard to the situation of men and women, an understanding of gender gaps in the following key areas will move the agenda of leaving no one behind forward: Market participation Equal representation of both sexes in the labour force is important; gender equality allows for an increase in the number of women participating in the work force, which expands the labour force and can contribute towards increased economic productivity and growth. Resource equity Indicators of mens and womens asset ownership and control are important measures used to monitor gender equality. This is achieved when people are able to access and enjoy the same rewards, resources and opportunities regardless of whether they are male or female. Womens ownership of and control over resources is one of the key elements of empowerment. Governance Gender equality in positions of decision-making, as well as political representation, are important not only from an empowerment perspective, but also to ensure that issues affecting women are considered during policy formulation, planning and programme/project implementation. Stats SA publishes a wide range of statistics in various reports and publications, highlighting the challenges experienced by women and men in South Africa as measured through household surveys and censuses conducted by StatsSA, as well as other sources.read more »


Agricultural Statistics

The history of agricultural statistics in South Africa goes back as far back as the beginning of the 20th century. With the exception of the World Wars and great depression years, an agricultural census was conducted on annual basis in the first half of the 20th century. As agricultures contribution to the countrys gross domestic product (GDP) decreased over the years, so did the frequency of conducting agricultural censuses. Post 1994, agricultural censuses have been conducted on a five yearly basis, with annual surveys being conducted in between the census years. Until now, agricultural censuses and surveys have largely concentrated on commercial agriculture leaving out small-scale and subsistence agriculture. In 2009, Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) conducted an audit of agricultural statistics in the country. One of the findings was that the country lacked information on smallholder and subsistence agriculture. The current list of farmers being used to conduct surveys was mainly confined to commercial agriculture. A decision was taken that three questions related to agriculture would be included in the Population Census 2011 (Census 2011) questionnaire. The main objective was to identify all households involved in agriculture in the country, so that a complete frame of all individuals and entities involved in agriculture (both subsistence and commercial) could be generated. This will allow for a comprehensive agricultural census to be conducted.read more »


Household Service Delivery Statistics

The dawn of democracy in 1994 created a new dispensation in which access to basic services such as housing, water and sanitation was recognized as a fundamental human right. South Africa inherited high levels of poverty and it continues to be confronted with unequal and often inadequate access to resources, infrastructure and social services. The Bill of Rights enshrined the right to basic services and commanded that the state must take reasonable measures to achieve the progressive realisation of these rights. Faced by inadequate information about the state of development in South Africa, Statistics South Africa (then called the Central Statistical Service) launched the October Household Survey (OHS) programme in 1993. The survey was discontinued in 1999 and subsequently replaced by the General Household Survey (GHS) which was instituted in 2002 in order to determine the level of development in the country and the performance of programs and projects on a regular basis. The GHS continues to evolve and key questions are continuously added and/or modified in consultation with key stakeholders to maintain the relevance and quality of data. In addition to measuring access to key services, the level of satisfaction with, as well as perceived quality of selected services provided by Government are also measured.read more »


Work & Labour Force

There are different forms of work, these include work as employment (work to generate income), unpaid work which includes volunteer work and domestic work for own final household consumption. Statistics South Africa measures all forms of work including work which should be abolished like child labour.

Work as employment is measured from two sources, establishment surveys and household based surveys. The Quarterly Employment Survey (QES) is establishment based while The Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) is a household based survey. The two sources differ in coverage, scope, unit of measurement and method of collection. Because of these differences, the two sources yield different figures. However, the two sources should be regarded as complementary rather than competitive.

Each source has advantages and limitations in terms of statistics yielded. The QES covers non-agricultural formal sector employment while the QLFS covers total employment in all industries and sectors. The QLFS can also provide information on demographic characteristics of the labour force (employment and unemployment) which the QES cannot provide.

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