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Molemole

Molemole Local Municipality is located about 60km north of Polokwane within the Capricorn District. It is in the town of Mogwadi, formerly known as Dendron. The municipality is bordered to the south by Polokwane Municipality, to the north-west by Blouberg Municipality, to the south-east by Greater Letaba Municipality in Mopani District, and to the north by Makhado Municipality in Vhembe District. One national road, the N1, crosses through the municipal area linking Molemole with Zimbabwe to the north, whereas the provincial road P94/1 (R521) passes through the municipality and links Molemole to Botswana to the west. It is the smallest municipality in the Capricorn District with 14 wards. The municipality is named after one of the mountains surrounding the area.

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Victor Khanye

Victor Khanye Local Municipality is situated in Mpumalanga province, within the Nkangala District Municipality. It is located in the Western Highveld of the Nkangala District Municipality. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, in the Gauteng province, borders Victor Khanye Local Municipality to the west. It is bordered to the north by the Kungwini Local Municipality, to the south by the Govan Mbeki and Lesedi Local Municipalities

The municipality is strategically located, as it is situated between Johannesburg in Gauteng and Nelspruit in Mpumalanga. It is also located close to the economically thriving metropolitan municipalities in Gauteng namely, Ekurhuleni and Tshwane. It is 10km from the N12 Highway, which joins the N4 Maputo corridor, the main link between Gauteng , Mpumalanga and Mozambique.

The area is approximately 1 570 km in extent. The area is mostly plain with a few rocky outcrops and meandering rivers. Settlements in the area are sparsely distributed. Urban settlements are found mostly in Eloff, Sundra, Delmas and Botleng. Rural settlements include Brakfontein, Argent, Arbor, Dryden and Waaikraal. Agricultural settlements in the form of smallholdings are also found in Eloff, Sundra (Droogefontein and Reitkol), Strydpan and Delmas (Leeupoort). Dryden is also a railway settlement with industrial development.

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Nkomazi

The Nkomazi Local Municipality is located in the eastern part of the Ehlanzeni District Municipality of the Mpumalanga Province. The municipality is strategically placed between Swaziland (north of Swaziland) and Mozambique (east of Mozambique). It is linked with Swaziland by two provincial roads and with Mozambique by a railway line and the main national road (N4), which forms the Maputo Corridor.
The Nkomazi Municipality is bounded by the Mozambique to the east, Swaziland to the south, Kruger National Park to the north, Umjindi Local Municipality to the south west and Mbombela Local Municipality from the northwest to west. The main urban centres are Louws Creek; Kaapmuiden; Malelane, Hectorspruit, Marloth Park, Komatipoort, KaMhlushwa, Tonga and KaMaqhekeza.

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Bushbuckridge

Bushbuckridge Local Municipality is one of the five constituents of Ehlanzeni District Municipality in Mpumalanga, and is bounded by Kruger National Park in the east and Mbombela in the South. It also forms part of the Kruger to Canyon Biosphere. The Municipal area provides a link to Limpopo Province and can therefore be called the gateway to the major tourism attraction points in Mpumalanga and the eastern part of the Limpopo Province. Bushbuckridge Local Municipality consists of 135 settlements and is divided into 34 wards. (www.nra.co.za)

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Ratlou

Ratlou Local Municipality is one of the local municipalities under Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality in the North West Province and is one of the five local municipalities. http://www.ratlou.gov.zaread more »


Transport

Transport and the need for transport has become an important part of daily life in South Africa. Not only does the movement of goods and services play an important part in the South African economy, but the types of transport available to individuals affects spatial decisions in terms of work, entertainment, education and place of residence. Stats SA publishes a range of transport-related information in various reports and publications. Travel survey The National Household Travel survey (NHTS) provides insight into the travel patterns of South African households, providing information on modes of transport used, such as land, air and water transport, as well as cycling, walking, public and private transport. Also included are statistics on travel times, transport challenges experienced by households, and travel patterns related to work, education and leisure. NHTS surveys were conducted in 2003 and 2013. Transport and the economy Stats SAs quarterly Gross domestic product (GDP) release provides information on the size and growth of various industries in the South African economy, including the transport industry. The same publication also includes figures on overall household expenditure on transport. The monthly Motor trade sales release provides the time series data of trade in motor vehicles and motor accessories. The Land transport survey, published on a monthly basis, provides data on passenger and freight transportation by land. The Producer Price Index (PPI) release provides information on the prices of transport equipment leaving the factory gate. The extent to which prices of fuel, public transport and private transport are changing is covered in the monthly Consumer Price Index (CPI) release. Employment Stats SAs Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) and Quarterly Employment Survey (QES) provide information on the number of individuals employed in various industries, including the transport industry. Financial indicators The Quarterly Financial Statistics (QFS) and Annual Financial Statistics (AFS) reports provide a financial overview of various industries, including transport, storage and communication. Data on turnover, income and expenditure, profit or loss and various balance sheet items are also included in the reports. The transport and storage industry report for 2013 provides more in-depth information on the size, nature and structure of the transport and storage industry. This periodic survey provides details on employment within the industry, trading income, expenditure, profit or loss, inventories, sales and services, and purchases.read more »


South Africa and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

In the year 2000 the South African government, along with other members of the United Nations (UN), committed to a national and global plan of action to reduce poverty and ensure the development of its people. The sixth and final Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Country Report for 2015 provides an overview of the progress South Africa has made towards achieving the eight MDGs. In addition, it provides an historical account of South Africas development in numbers. The MDGs are:

  1. To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
  2. To promote universal primary education
  3. To promote gender equality and empower women
  4. To reduce child mortality
  5. To improve maternal health
  6. To combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
  7. To ensure environmental sustainability
  8. To develop a global partnership for the development.

This report reflects the intense national effort, from a range of institutions, organisations and individuals, to improve the lives of all South Africans; particularly the poor and marginalised. A great many people have contributed to this report through their participation in various consultative fora across the country, often at great expense and sacrifice. What started 15 years ago certainly does not end here, and reporting on development issues will continue through the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It is therefore critical that South Africas unfinished MDG business, as well as emerging developmental issues, be appropriately integrated within the SDGs in a manner that places the spotlight on them, while providing adequate direction and impetus for effective planning, development of appropriate policies and budgets, and the construction of appropriate national monitoring and reporting systems.

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Work & Labour Force

There are different forms of work, these include work as employment (work to generate income), unpaid work which includes volunteer work and domestic work for own final household consumption. Statistics South Africa measures all forms of work including work which should be abolished like child labour.

Work as employment is measured from two sources, establishment surveys and household based surveys. The Quarterly Employment Survey (QES) is establishment based while The Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) is a household based survey. The two sources differ in coverage, scope, unit of measurement and method of collection. Because of these differences, the two sources yield different figures. However, the two sources should be regarded as complementary rather than competitive.

Each source has advantages and limitations in terms of statistics yielded. The QES covers non-agricultural formal sector employment while the QLFS covers total employment in all industries and sectors. The QLFS can also provide information on demographic characteristics of the labour force (employment and unemployment) which the QES cannot provide.

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Causes of Death 2013

The registration of deaths in South Africa is governed by the Births and Deaths Registration Act, 1992 (Act No. 51 of 1992), as amended. The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) uses death notification form DHA-1663 to register all deaths and stillbirths. Stats SA collects completed death notification forms from the DHA head office for data processing, analysis, report writing and dissemination. Causes of death statistics are compiled in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) regulations that require that member nations classify and code causes of death using the tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). Statistics from civil registration are the only national source of information on mortality and causes of death in South Africa. Such information is invaluable for the assessment and monitoring of the health status of the population and for planning of adequate health interventions. Accordingly, these statistics are also essential in tracking progress and monitoring key development objectives outlined in the National Development Plan (NDP) adopted by the South African government in 2012. The plan asserts that health care can be improved through decreasing mortality by combating infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS and the emerging tide of non-communicable diseases. The government objective, Health care for all by 2030 outlined in the NDP is aimed at reducing child and infant mortality; maternal mortality; and combating HIV/AIDS and other diseases by 2030.read more »


Crime statistics

  Crime prevention and ultimate elimination is one of the priority goals of the National Development Plan (NDP). Crime affects all people irrespective of their background, and it is a topic that attracts a lot of media attention. Analysis will show that some groupings are affected by certain types of crime more than others. Crime statistics are essential in order to understand the temporal and spatial dynamics of crime. Such understanding is vital for planning targeted interventions and assessing progress made towards achieving a crime free nation where "people living in South Africa feel safe at home, at school and at work, and they enjoy a community life free of fear. Women walk freely in the streets and children play safely outside". There are two major sources of crime statistics in South Africa, namely the South African Police Service (SAPS) and Statistics South Africa (Stats SA). The other smaller sources such as the Institute for Security Studies (ISS) and the Medical Research Council (MRC) are by no means insignificant, as they provide statistics for types of crime not adequately covered by the major players, such as domestic violence. While the methodologies used by the SAPS and Stats SA are very different, the two institutions produce crime statistics that complement each other. The SAPS produces administrative data of crime reported to police stations by victims, the public and crime reported as a result of police activity. Stats SA produces crime statistics estimated from household surveys. Crimes reported to the SAPS do not always have the same definitions as crime statistics produced from VOCS. In addition, not all crimes reported by the SAPS are reported by VOCS and vice versa. Working in close collaboration with Stats SA, the South African Police Service has undertaken to align its Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (CCSP) to the International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (ICCS). Highlights of the 2017/18 Victims of Crime report Aggregate crime levels increased in 2017/18 compared to 2016/17. It is estimated that over 1,5 million incidences of household crime occurred in South Africa in 2017/18, which constitutes an increase of 5% compared to the previous year. Incidences of crime on individuals are estimated to be over 1,6 million, which is an increase of 5% from the previous year. Aggregate household crime levels increased in Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, North West, Gauteng and Mpumalanga. Individual crime levels increased in Free State, North West and Gauteng. North West experienced a drastic increase of 80% in the individual crime level. Perceptions of South Africans on crime in 2017/18 were more skeptical compared to the previous year. About 42% thought property crime increased during the past three years. This is an increase of 6,9% from the previous year. 46% thought violent crime increased during the past three years, an increase of 4,5% over the previous year. Western Cape was the most skeptical about crime trends, as 84% of Western Cape residents thought that crime in South African increased or stayed the same. Mpumalanga was the least skeptical among the nine provinces, where 65% thought that crime increased or stayed the same during the past three years. Crimes that are feared most are those that are most common. An estimated 79% of South Africans felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhoods during the day, which is a decrease of 6,7% from last year. About 32% of South Africans felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhoods at night, constituting an increase of 8% from last year. The highlights for household and individual experiences of crime from the 2016/17 VOCS report are as follows:  read more »